Why use a springform pan?

Springform pan

A springform pan is a type of cake pan that has removable sides. The strip of metal that makes up the sides of the pan is shaped into a ring and is held together with an adjustable latch or buckle. It can be tightened by snapping the latch into place, tightening the ring and creating a tight seal with the pan’s base. When unlatched, the ring expands and can easily be removed from the cake and/or the cake base.

A springform pan can be used in place or a regular cake pan in any recipe. When the ring is closed, they bake cakes (or other baked goods) in exactly the same way as a standard one-piece pan. The difference comes when you want to remove the cake that is inside the pan. With most pans, the cake must be inverted to remove it from the pan. This isn’t a good idea with all cakes, like delicate cheesecakes or cakes with toppings on them, such as streusel-heavy coffee cakes, because the cakes would never survive being flipped upside down out of a regular pan in one piece! With a springform, you can essentially remove the pan from the cake with great ease. Typically, cakes baked in springform pans are cooled right in the pan and the ring is removed before serving. The cake can be served directly on the pan’s base or carefully slid off onto a cake plate or othe serving platter.

10 comments

  1. Awesome. This is a great reference!

  2. what do you think of the glass bottom springforms vs metal?

  3. I looked everywhere for this info…thanks! :>)

  4. Tia – I only use metal-bottom springform pans. Glass/pyrex retains heat differently than metal does (usually retains more heat so can potentially hotter and longer), so my preference would be not to use a pan made with two different materials like that. Plus, the metal pans are cheaper and I find that they hold up great.

  5. Typically, cakes baked in springform pans are cooled right in the pan and the ring is removed before serving. The cake can be served directly on the pan’s base or carefully slid off onto a cake plate or othe serving platter.

  6. Mary Ann Schweers

    I recently made a Streusel Kuchen. Baked at 350 for one hour. I took the cake out of the oven and 2 hour slater the center was in the bottom of the pan. i would like some help please?

  7. I had this pan for yrs & did not know how to use it. Great article. Tried it yesterday. Love it! Thanks for the info and Happy New Year 2014!

  8. Mary Ann Schweers, I know this is…3 years late,… but it sounds like your cake was under-baked. This happens to me ALL the time; I use a skewer and it comes out clean, so I remove the cake from the oven . A few minutes later, the middle starts deflating (maybe you didn’t notice because the top was covered with streusel?) and it is a sloppy mess. I have started to notice that this happens when the middle has made a very small dome or looks kind of flat. I assume it’s done, but it actually needs more time become rounder and even more domed. Hope this is helpful, even if it is late!

  9. I have always found toothpicks lie as well, I use a regular salad for and it seems to grip uncooked batter better than a toothpick so you can tell if it is really done

  10. ‘Salad fork’ is what that should say

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